Roman gods and the Changing of the Calendar

Time for a history lesson.

Did you know that the month of January is named after the Roman god Janus.  Janus was a god with two faces.  One face is filled with sadness and seems to look backwards.  The other face is filled with hope as it looks forward.  It becomes the two faces of the New Year…one that looks back at the previous year and one that looks forward to the new year. 

At what point in the year does that hope-filled face realize that it’s the sad face of despair again?  For me a couple weeks into January, I realize any concept of resolutions aren’t important and/or aren’t going to come into fruition.  Perhaps the hope filled face starts to slip a bit by the end of the first month of the year.

As believers, we can be assured that our hope doesn’t have to tie to the flipping of the calendar page to indicate a New Year.  Our God is the same “yesterday, and today and forever” (Hebrews 13:8).  God is over our past, our present and our future. He’s not just there on the 31st of December as we make promises to ourselves about how much better the next year will be.

And if that’s true, well then…it doesn’t matter what the date is on the calendar.  It truly doesn’t matter which way the face is turned…the reality is that there is hope in our face of happiness and sadness.  It’s the hope of a future with Jesus. 

One of the greatest promises we can read in the Bible is when God promises that He will never leave us or forsake us in Hebrews 13:5. This promise stands year-round, year after year.

Read that again…a promise that stands year-round.  Every year.

Our God is an awesome God who provides for us through trials and tribulations.  And He provides for us through triumph and victory.  It does not matter what we are going through, He will be with us. It does not matter if we are happy or sad, He will be with us.  It simply does not matter what season of life we are in, He will be with us.


There’s no need for us to subscribe to the Roman god’s concept of having two faces for our year…we have the one true God to rely on.  I pray you know this now and every day of 2023. 

Happy New Year!

~Emily

Wreaths Across America

I had the privilege of laying wreaths at Arlington National Cemetery last Saturday.  As an Air Force museum curator and advocate for enlisted history, I had a list of Airmen that I wanted to visit while I was at the cemetery. Despite being ready to walk miles in the rain laying wreaths, I wasn’t ready for the emotional reaction I had to visiting some of these graves.  I started crying at the headstones of Airmen I had met and those I’d never met.  I was truly surprised by my tears.

After the emotional morning, I did a little digging on the history of the Christmas wreath.

– Wreaths are typically evergreen as a symbol of the strength of life

– Holly symbolizes immortality

– Cedar symbolizes strength and healing

– Red of the ribbon is the bloodshed (some say by militaries; others by Christ)

– In ancient Rome & Greece, wreaths were a sign of victory of achievement

– By the 16th century, Christians in Germany used wreaths as the hope in Christ

All of these facts about the Christmas wreath seem so fitting for the fallen heroes at our National Cemeteries.

Wreaths Across America is a non-profit organization that started in 2007 as a means to honor our fallen war heroes at National Cemeteries.  Each year they coordinate the wreath-laying in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and 24 countries around the world.  https://www.wreathsacrossamerica.org

Their mission includes three simple words:

Remember. Honor. Teach.

In remembering fallen military members at Arlington in learning the meaning of the wreath, I found that I focused on the three-word mission statement.  “Remember. Honor. Teach.”

Beautiful words about our military members, which are also applicable to our Christian faith.

As we head into the final weeks of madness leading to Christmas, let’s take a moment to reflect this week on what God did for us by allowing his only Son to come to earth to die for us.  Let’s remember, honor and teach this Christmas season.

~Emily

Snow Graves

When Stones Cry

I’m not Catholic, but I’ve been to plenty of Catholic churches, masses, and services.

Remember, I’m fascinated by history so most things Catholic are the mother-lode of historic happiness.

When I was about 11-years-old, my parents took my brother and me to a Catholic Church that had a statue of Mary that had reportedly wept real tears.  I remember that there was a long line to get into the church and that several people in line were crying.

As a child, I knew that there was something unusual about a statute reportedly weeping.  Yet, I could not wrap my mind around the significance of that statute being considered a miracle.  In retrospect, I suppose I still have trouble understanding how God would allow an inanimate object to express human emotion.

I am reminded that there are several lessons within the Bible where inanimate objects became a teaching point.   Some of those teaching points included human qualities being assigned to objects.  For instance, in Luke Chapter 19, we read that rocks could potentially vocalize like a person.

“And some of the Pharisees from among the multitude said until Him, Master, rebuke thy disciples.  And He answered and said unto them, I tell you that if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out.”  Luke 19:39-40 (KJV)

While this passage of scripture does not contend that the stones actually shouted, I love the thought that God could make them do so if He chose to.  I find great comfort in knowing that my God is so mighty, so powerful, so strong…that He could do anything if He wished.

If He wanted the stones to cry out, they would.

If He wanted a statue to cry, it would.

Imagine what He’s doing in our lives every day!  Every day there’s a miracle within our lives that God is orchestrating.  Every day.

A God that unbelievably able is one I want to worship always!

~Emily

Stones