The Santa Dilemma

I never believed in Santa as a real person.  From the time I was little, my parents taught me Santa was make-believe and a fun game that everyone played around Christmas.  Their explanation was that they wanted me to believe in Jesus, who was intangible and unseen with human eyes.  If I later found out Santa wasn’t real after believing he was, would I also question the existence of Jesus?

It worked for our family and was my game plan for when I had my own children.

Until I was introduced to an adorable 2-year-old who I would later adopt.  The issue?  He already had been told that Santa was real.  He was “all-in” on the fantasy.  He still is as a 3rd grader.  How was I going to strip him of that belief when he’d already had so much turmoil and loss in his short life?

This is probably his last year believing in Santa as a real person. He has started to ask questions about the practicality of delivering gifts around the world. He’s letting us know there are some kids in his class that don’t believe in Santa. He’s paying attention to movies more and is questioning how Buddy the Elf fixes the sleigh or Tim Allen becomes Santa after falling off the roof.

He’s asking about if I believe in Santa.

I’m verbally bobbing and weaving; not lying, but definitely not telling him the truth.  I’m in a grey area that has me super worried about how he’ll take the news that Santa isn’t real.  Will he resent us for letting him believe? Will he accept that it’s a “game” everyone plays?

But most important to me, how will he maintain his belief in Jesus when Santa is no longer a real dude?  I keep coming back to Proverbs 22:6 “Train up a child in the way he should go, And when he is old he will not depart from it.” (NKJV).  As a Christian parent, I’m doing my very best to raise him up in the way he should go, but frankly, the Santa dilemma has me concerned.

“Belief”

This is the newest word that is front and center on my prayer board.  It’s on the cover of my prayer journal. It’s a post-it on my dashboard.

It has become my single word prayer over the last week.  I’m praying with all my might that this little guy will have true and wholehearted belief in Jesus Christ as his Savior.  That the news of Santa will not de-rail that child-like faith he possesses.  I pray that he holds fast to his belief.

If you have time this week, please join me on the porch praying for all the littles of the world to know Jesus…to have belief in Christ…to balance faith with earthly knowledge.

~Emily

Father God, we are so very grateful for the gift of your Son as our Savior.  Please let the children of the world have an opportunity to accept this gift and to know your love.  Let their belief in you be bigger and bolder than the beliefs in worldly concepts, like Santa.  We pray these things in your holy name. Amen.

Santa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Release the Fear and Lies

Last week I wrote about how the meaning of our names can predict our destinies and purpose.  In order for us to walk in our destinies, we must reject the lies that we have been believing and begin to overcome our fears.

The strength that it takes to defeat the giants in the Promised Land is the same strength that will keep us in the Promised Land.  Beneath each sin or compromise we have struggled with, we can typically find a root lie or fear that we began to believe.

Before I met my husband, I was on a dating profile where I had indicated that I was training for a half marathon.  I had a knee injury and was unable to continue training for the race.  However, I believed I couldn’t find a suitable date unless men saw me as actively fit.  Because of that belief, I never changed that portion of my dating profile.  Even after months of not running, I was still matched with uber fit dudes who were surprised that I didn’t indicate my fitness ritual within the first few moments of communicating.

So, there I was believing a lie about needing to be fit in order to date.  There I was engaged in the sin of deception because I believed that lie.

Take a look at Jacob.  In Genesis 28:10-15, we read that Jacob has a dream regarding his offspring being scattered throughout the lands.  Essentially all the people of the earth would be blessed through the promises offered to Jacob and his descendants.

But by Genesis 32:22-32, we see that Jacob wrestles with a man to the point he has an afflicted hip.  Jacob tells the man he will not release him unless he first offers a blessing.  The man tells Jacob that his name is to be changed to Israel and offers a blessing. God wrestles with Jacob, changes his name, and offers a blessing.

What were Jacob’s fears or what lies was he believing?  He believed he was inadequate and unworthy.  He was insecure.  The underlying equation in this story is Jacob requiring a blessing in return for releasing the man.  He did not believe the blessings that were pronounced over him before his birth.  He wasn’t allowing God to work in God’s timing. He did not believe the dream.

Each of us has doubts. Each of us has fears. Each of us believes lies that aren’t ours to believe.  When you consider Jacob’s doubt and belief in lies and fear, do you feel as though you are in good company?

This week I want to encourage you to read Isaiah 43:1-7.  What are some of the promises that God gives us in this passage?  Write those promises down and recall them to your life right now in 2019.

~Emily

Release the Fear and Lies